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My teacher said in class, " the direction of the acceleration of an ion located in a region without magnetic field but with electric field does not depend on the relative orientation of its velocity with respect to the direction of the electric field".

However I do not understand why this is.

My argument is as follows: Let's say that a positive ion is moving towards the right with its velocity in that direction and there is a negative ion located to the left of it. Wouldn't the positive ion be attracted towards the negative ion due to the direction of the electric field created?

Please let me know if my argument is flawed or if I am missing something.

I am very grateful for your help in advance.

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Yes it would, in your example the teacher was talking about the electric field created by the negative ion. That field would attract the positive ion.

It could still be moving to the right until the acceleration to the left (caused by the attraction of the negative ion) had acted long enough to change the original velocity of the positive ion.

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What your teacher said is that the positive ion would be attracted towards the negative ion regardless whether it is moving to the right, left, top or bottom. In other words, the electrostatic force does not depend on velocity. This is in contrast to the magnetostatic force, which does depend on the velocity.

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