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I apologise if this is a stupid question but I haven't studied physics in over 20 years!

I think I'm correct in saying that sound waves have a number of characteristics (including frequency and amplitude), and when two objects emit sound waves at the same frequency the waves become amplified as a result of resonance.

So (provided that my basic understanding of these concepts is correct) my question is: do the distance between objects and their amplitude affect whether or not resonance occurs? For example: if object A only resonates when object B is within a meter's distance, could it resonate at a greater distance if the amplitude of object B were to be increased by some other hypothetical means?

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The amplitude of motion of a driveN system depends on the amplitude of the driveR and the frequency of the driveR.

By amplitude of driveR I mean the part of its motion which actually couples with the driveN system which amongst other factors will depend on the actual amplitude of the driveR, the distance between driveR and driveN, and the medium between driveR and driveN.

The frequency response of the driveN system will not change its shape but the scale of the amplitude response will depend on the amount of coupling.

In the video Watch Sound Waves Shatter a Wine Glass at 187,000 Frames Per Second, to get the effect that the demonstrated wanted note (breaking the wine glass) that he channels the sound wave from a source to the wine class using a tube.

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