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My textbook says that a diverging lens works by rendering the object a virtual image at the myopic eye’s far point. However, wouldn’t the eye then perceive an object farther than its far point at the far point, rather than where it truly is, beyond the far point? For example, if the far point of the eye is 30 cm, and you place something that’s 50 cm away from it, a diverging lens will cause the image to form at 30 cm, allowing the eye to see it with its lengthened shape. But why do we still perceive that object to be at 50 cm? If the image is at 30 cm, why do we not see it at 30 cm?

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The correcting lens allows a focussed image at the retina. So what it does is correct the myopic apparent distance to be the actual distance. Which is aside from the issue of depth perception.

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Single eyes don't perceive distance. Distance is perceived using two eyes as a stereoscopic pair.

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  • $\begingroup$ After taking both the eyes then in both the eyes also a virtual image is formed at the far point of myopic eye $\endgroup$ Oct 19, 2021 at 8:58
  • $\begingroup$ Then in this case how we perceive distance as infinity and not the far point of myopic eye $\endgroup$ Oct 19, 2021 at 8:58
  • $\begingroup$ @Ayushshukla10g we never perceive distance as "far point of the eye". The brain does a good job figuring out the distance to the object from two images on the retinas. There's no difference how these images were formed, only the parallax between details of the two images matters. $\endgroup$
    – Ruslan
    Oct 19, 2021 at 9:18
  • $\begingroup$ No I was saying that the far point of the eye is where the virtual image is there and it is also small in size then why not we see object as small $\endgroup$ Oct 19, 2021 at 9:30
  • $\begingroup$ @Ayushshukla10g all objects become smaller. The one in focus is not disproportionately small, that's why it doesn't seem farther. And the brain easily adapts to the change in perceived size of the full scene. $\endgroup$
    – Ruslan
    Oct 19, 2021 at 9:36

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