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I distinctly remember reading some article claiming some physicists had discovered a time-irreversible, subatomic quantum mechanical interaction. Is my memory just foggy or has this really been found?

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  • $\begingroup$ You don't need the part about "non-measurement." The Copenhagen interpretation's distinction between measurement and other physical processes is not fundamentally well defined, and the resulting wavefunction collapse is not a physical process. $\endgroup$
    – user4552
    Jun 1 '13 at 19:10
  • $\begingroup$ What do you mean by "not a physical process?" It's something that occurs in reality, isn't it? $\endgroup$
    – Izzhov
    Jun 1 '13 at 21:27
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    $\begingroup$ That word "reality" is notoriously hard to define. I would say that no, it isn't something that occurs in reality, in the sense that it's only a feature of the Copenhagen interpretation (CI), and other interpretations such as many worlds (MWI) predict all the same experimental observables without including a notion of wavefunction collapse. Another way of putting it is that the physical laws of quantum mechanics describe how quantum-mechanical systems evolve over time, and those laws do not describe any such thing as wavefunction collapse. $\endgroup$
    – user4552
    Jun 3 '13 at 21:32
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Maybe the article was about CP violation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP_violation ), which seems to imply violation of the symmetry with respect to time reversal.

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