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If an object (symmetric and circular/cylindrical/spherical) is made to roll on a surface and is made to fall from the edge of the surface, will its rotational kinetic energy convert to translational kinetic energy considering that there is no air resistance whatsoever? Does this have anything to do with translational velocity? As far as I know it is not dependent on translational motion.

I have come to know from one of the answers to a question previously asked in this forum that the inertia (linear) of particles of an symmetric object keeps the object spinning/revolving even though there is no external influence. I am not sure if this is the correct explanation for my question as well or not. I just need a bit of clarification.

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  • $\begingroup$ You already answered your question, which is Newton's first law or law of inertia. In space, there is no acceleration due to gravity, so object won't fall, it just floats. In other two cases, if the object falls while spinning, then its transnational + rotational. $\endgroup$
    – 147875
    Commented Sep 16, 2021 at 16:02

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The only way the rotational energy would change is if an external torque is applied.

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No. An object that is both spinning and translating which falls will continue both spinning and translating until arrested in some way

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