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What is the lowest temperature in the hottest part of the ember of an oxygen starved low temperature smouldering fire the hypothetical fire glows a dull and faint orange at night, not red but orange, but very faint nevertheless and is not seen at dusk or twilight . It produces a lot of smoke and carbon monoxide , burns for days very slowly . An unpuffed cigarette can ignite paper in 30 seconds and an incense stick instantly , this fire takes about 1 minute . If touched it’s skin burn is similar to a curling iron on medium to low heat in the same amount of exposure time , but it still is obviously at least 3 times as hot , but skin burn is usually more a product of heat flux and conductivity than degrees . Smouldering pipe tobacco and slow Garbage dump fires are the inspiration for this hypothetical fire . What would the average maximum temperature be in the glow ? I know 932 Fahrenheit or 500 Celsius is generally an accepted minimum glow or incandescence temperature , but a smouldering fire in the real world is far from a black body furnace and has different emissivity . What would it be ? My hypothesizes is 600 Celsius or 1112 Fahrenheit .

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The temperatures for smoldering combustion and glowing combustion will of course depend on the material as well as the physical characteristics of the object burning. Moreover, smoldering and glowing combustion can transition quickly to flaming combustion with sufficient oxygen enrichment.

To put things into perspective, according to the site:

https://www.physlink.com/education/askexperts/ae1.cfm

  1. The temperature of a lit cigarette without drawing is 400 C on the side of the lit portion and 580 C on the middle portion of the lit cigarette.

  2. The temperature of a lit cigarette during drawing is 700 C on the middle of the lit portion.

The first is an example of smoldering combustion. The second glowing combustion.

Hope this helps.

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