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Comparing Optical Fiber Light Tubes losses and regular Fiber Optic Losses, there seems to be a large disparity.

The light tubes reach 100m, whereas the regular ones go for kilometers.

I've tried to look into it via the wikipedia sources, but all I can guess is that having multiple daylight wavelengths interfere?

What physical property causes this loss in the light tube version vs the non-light tube version?

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Promoted from a comment:

Long haul fiber optics use a very narrow range of wavelengths selected for being centered on the minimum loss window of highly-pure silica around 1.5 microns. The desire to stretch across oceans with minimal repeaters drove a very large research effort. Bringing some light a 100 meters or so has no such hard engineering requirements and is driven by cost not performance.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for converting the comment, however do you have more details about the physics involved? Why narrow band, why does that give it a small loss window? Why is that not the case for natural light etc. I'm not really interested in the cost/engineering side of things. $\endgroup$
    – Pureferret
    Jun 23 at 1:37

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