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I used a compressed air can to clean my laptop's keyboard and speakers. After that procedure I noticed there're small bubbles in the holes of the speakers. I've tried to pop them with a thin brush and then with a needle, but the bubbles just bend inward the speakers and return back. So, I've been living with these bubbles for about 1,5 month already, and I'm interesting, why they are so durable and how could I get rid of them?bubbles

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  • $\begingroup$ Bubbles hold there due to surface tension. May be this post could be useful for you chemistry.stackexchange.com/questions/73488/…. $\endgroup$ May 29, 2021 at 13:25
  • $\begingroup$ can you maybe try a vaccuum cleaner to suck them out ? $\endgroup$ May 29, 2021 at 13:26
  • $\begingroup$ I've actually tried a vacuum cleaner, no result $\endgroup$
    – goedwig
    May 29, 2021 at 13:37

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If you have lived with them for more than a month and they have not evaporated, they are not liquid.

I get the same thing when I crush garlic with a garlic press. Pieces of garlic get stuck in the small holes.

I find that a toothbrush or similar brush works. Individual fibers poke into the holes and push the dirt out. This would leave dirt inside your case. You might open the case so this doesn't happen.

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This is meant as a comment (but without appropriate reputation).

If it truly is a liquid (and not flash from the molding prosess - that you are now noticing), try wicking it away with something wettable and with finer capilliaries. Such as a tissue.

Also, I would be careful to not damage the speaker membrane and not spray pressurized air into it.

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