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I learned that all material objects emit electromagnetic (light) radiation. But, we can only "see" visible light. I'm aware that non-visible light is 'invisible' to us; however, I was wondering about this. Doesn't the sun emit UV light, and isn't it visible to us? Rather, I should ask, isn't the source of the UV light (the sun) visible?

If an object emits any type of EM radiation, will it be technically visible? Thank you.

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Yes, any object that emits any form of radiation is visible to us. However, since humans are capable of directly observing, only the visible light wavelengths, so, we'll ofcourse need special devices to observe said radiation. The sun emits UV radiation, as well as visible light and other forms of radiation. We are just able to see the visible light part of it. I can provide the link to a youtube video, that shows how the world would appear from an ultraviolet lens, if you want.

Snakes for example, can see infrared, and butterflies can see ultraviolet, if I'm not wrong.

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  • $\begingroup$ I see, thanks for the answer! $\endgroup$
    – adibak
    May 26 at 23:02
  • $\begingroup$ @adibak absolutely welcome. I'd suggest you close the question, and accept one of the answers here, if any of them seem satisfactory to you. $\endgroup$ May 26 at 23:31
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Our eyes can only detect EM radiation in a narrow range. But devices that detect lower ranges as IR detectors, can process the information and display it as visible light (the range our retinas can see).

All bodies above absolute zero emit EM radiation.

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  • $\begingroup$ I see...thanks! $\endgroup$
    – adibak
    May 26 at 23:03
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Warm clear glass emits infrared radiation according to its temperature, but allows visible light to pass through. So it is not "visible" to us if you consider only the narrow range of visible light. However, if you use the appropriate instrument (an infrared detector) you can detect the glass, so it is "visible" in the infrared.

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  • $\begingroup$ I see....Thanks! $\endgroup$
    – adibak
    May 26 at 23:03

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