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Centripetal force would literally mean ‘the centre-seeking force’. So in order to bring a body towards the centre it turns it and the body is always trying to reach the centre however is unable to reach it and ends up rotating. Is this way of describing circular motion-rotation about a fixed axis correct? Also is it that a rotating body would feel an inward pull towards the centre? Why or why not?

[Here: rotation could be like any of Earth’s two circular motions of rotation about its axis and revolution about Sun]

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For a mass moving along a curve, there must be an applied force which is causing it to accelerate toward the center of curvature.

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Yes, it was correct to visualise a centripetal force as one that pulls a moving body towards the centre of curvature of the body's path of motion.

In your second question you talk about a rotating body. Are you clear about the different between rotation and circular motion? A body in circular motion must experience a force directed towards the centre of the circle- if there is no component of force towards the centre, then the body will continue in a straight line tangentially.

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  • $\begingroup$ What I mean wasn’t rotation but more like revolution in a circular (not elliptical) path. $\endgroup$ Apr 28, 2021 at 19:49

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