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I understand that a moving charge creates a magnetic field, the question is, does that created magnetic field have any effect on the motion of that very charged particle in simple terms does that created magnetic field contribute to the force on that very moving charge?

NB: I am referring to a quantum particle

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  • $\begingroup$ Hello, Cirus. I think your question will receive more responses, if you put the question directly in the title . Since, the actual question is short enough, it can fit in the title. Once people click on it, they can read the whole body to get the detailed explanation, but having the short question in the title will be easier for people who just glance at the list of questions $\endgroup$ Apr 23 at 9:05
  • $\begingroup$ Are you asking this about a quantum particle? Particle can mean many things. $\endgroup$
    – my2cts
    Apr 23 at 10:07
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A charged body in motion does generate some magnetic field, but does so in a direction perpendicular to its velocity (circumferential around the axis of motion). The effect of such a charge impinging on its own field generates a force perpendicular to BOTH the velocity of the charge, and to the field, which is... inward.

The effect is called a Z-pinch, and is responsible for the narrow tracks left in soil by lightning bolts... but is relatively unspectacular in less intense currents.

This kind of pinch is a major concern in fusion reactor research, since it would contain the charges in fully ionized gasses.

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  • $\begingroup$ I have the impression z pinch needs many charged particles in the same direction. I do not think that a single electron at constant velocity would be affected by "pinch" $\endgroup$
    – anna v
    Apr 23 at 10:37
  • $\begingroup$ I wasn't suggesting 'compressive force' on an elementary particle. More familiar magnetic compression is seen in 'coin shrinker' items, like here <capturedlightning.com/frames/shrinkergallery.html> $\endgroup$
    – Whit3rd
    Apr 24 at 6:41
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A charge is always at rest with regard to itself, so it won't see its own magnetic field. A magnetic field is only seen by other particles in case they are not co-moving with the first one.

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If the charge is considered point-like, then no, it does not feel its own field while in a uniform motion. But an accelerated or decelerated charge has a small "radiation friction:reaction" effect. Read R. Feynman lectures, chapter 28.

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