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I've read the reason sky appears blue is because blue wavelength is being scattered by the gas molecules, dust particles etc. Thus, because of this scattering, we are basically being bombarded with pure blue wavelength the most from the atmosphere in all directions.While during sunset, the blue wavelength is scattered to a maximum and we only see the least scattered lower wavelengths of yellow and red hues. But if blue wavelength is scattered to a maximum then shouldn't our eyes only perceive more blue colour? I know there's a mistake in my reasoning but I just wanted to clear this off in my head. Thank you

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It's not quite correct to say that blue light is scattered to a maximum at sunset and other wavelengths are scattered the least. As far as Rayleigh scattering is concerned shorter wavelengths are always scattered more than the longer wavelengths and this amount stays the same at all hours of the day.

Each particular wavelength of light experiences the same amount of scattering per distance traveled regardless of the time of day, and shorter wavelengths scatter more than longer wavelengths.

But what is different is that at sunset the light must travel through more atmosphere to reach your eye. That means, EVERY wavelength experiences more chances to be scattered, however much each wavelength scatters by. But since the blue scatters more than red, by the time it reaches your eye, so much blue light has been scattered (perpendicular to your line of vision) along the way that almost none is left to actually enter your eye.

Your eye only detects light that actually travels in a line to enter your eye. When the blue light is scattered, it is scattered in all directions Let's say the 6 sides of a cube, for example. One of those direction is directly away from your eye, four are perpendicular to your line of vision, and only one is actually towards your eye. And each time that light scatters in 6 directions, the scattered light scatters again in 6 directions over and over again; Each time sending more of the light that initially was traveling on a line straight to your eye in directions away from your eye.

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First, during day the sun is over our head so think light have to travel less distance and on entering our atmosphere it is scattered and as violet is having shortest wavelength it is scattered max. (not blue) , but as our eyes are more sensitive to blue color so we see the sky blue.

Second, during evening/ morning the sun rays have to travel larger distance. So, in doing so the rays having shorter wavelengths are left behind or does not reach the earth but light or rays having larger wavelengths(e.g. red, orange) reach earth's atmosphere and get scattered and we see the sky reddish or orangish..

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