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Simple question, I barely understand the situation of a faraday cage but what I'd really like clarification on is the interior of the faraday cage. I haven't been able to find any information on what happens to electricity on the interior of a faraday cage- does it present the same result? Not allowing anything to exit? Let's say, hypothetically, "electricity" is formed on the interior of a faraday cage. What's the result?

Also, please use layman's terms- I don't study physics majorly- and this isn't a homework problem. Simply just curiosity.

Sorry if I messed anything up on my question asking, but I hope you get the point. Feel free to correct me.

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This might not answer your question because I don't know what is the "same result" you mentioned. I will use two interpretations of what your "electricity" could mean.

  1. A Faraday cage blocks electromagnetic(EM) waves (One kind of "electricity") in both directions. In the case of waves, the surface of the cage is roughly acting like a mirror from both directions. For example, the microwave oven is a Faraday cage. The EM waves cooking the food stay inside the enclosure. If any gets out, it's very small in intensity compared to what's inside. For waves without net charges, the cage only needs to constantly redistribute the charges in the cage to create an opposite field to cancel the field form the source inside.

  2. If the "electricity" is a static electric field created by a charged object, then it won't be cancelled unless the cage is grounded, i.e. connected to a big source of free electrical charges like a rod in the ground. When the cage is grounded, it will attract enough charges of the opposite in order to cancel the field from the charges inside. If the cage is not grounded, the cage will emit a field but it won't reflect where exactly the charges are inside. From outside, it will look like only the cage itself is charged. If you have an equal part of negative and positive charges inside the cage, then the cage won't let any static electric field out.

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