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I really think those are the same thing, but couldn't be so sure.

Is there any difference between time convention and time domain?

For example: "wave propagates along x direction with $e^{jwt}$ time convention"

Here, does "time convention" mean time domain?

($e^{jwt}$: $t$ here means time)

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  • $\begingroup$ You will need to give us more context. Neither of these are standard phrases, so the meaning will depend on what context they are being used in. $\endgroup$ – DJClayworth Apr 7 at 18:45
  • $\begingroup$ @DJClayworth I edited the question based on your comments, thanks $\endgroup$ – murat Apr 7 at 18:53
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    $\begingroup$ This is about physics, not English. $\endgroup$ – Michael Harvey Apr 7 at 18:53
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    $\begingroup$ In math and physics, the domain of a function of is the set of all inputs, and it is very common to refer to a function as being in the time domain if it is a function of time (that is, it accepts all time values as inputs). I have never heard of "time convention" in a physics context and it has no meaning to me - where did you get that phrase from? $\endgroup$ – Canadian Yankee Apr 7 at 19:22
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    $\begingroup$ This isn't a basic language question, it is a technical one. As such, it is more appropriate for a technical SE site (such as Physics) where people with knowledge of these technical terms can be found. $\endgroup$ – Spencer Apr 7 at 19:25
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The terms are not exactly equivalent, although both likely hold in this context.

To work in the time domain is (broadly) to consider a signal's strength as it changes as a function of varying time (as opposed to varying frequency, for example). Parametrizing a signal in terms of e^jwt means working in the time domain because one can plug in the time t (in addition to the signal frequency w and probably a prefactor as well) and obtain the signal amplitude.

The phrase of interest, however, refers to a time convention. This is not a field-specific term but refers simply to the convention used to express the signal as a function of time. Here, the complex exponential form is used, where j is the imaginary number. Another option is the sinusoid form, with the two being related through Euler's identity (see also here). Does this make sense?

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No they aren't the same thing. The following explanation is from a DoD technical document.

Blockquote

https://apps.dtic.mil/sti/pdfs/ADA305743.pdf

The idea here is that there are multiple transforms from the frequency domain to the time domain, and you need to have a compact notation for handling the transforms. The time convention is how that time term is rendered in the time domain.

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