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Since mirage, in optics, the deceptive appearance of a distant object or objects caused by the bending of light rays (refraction) in layers of air of varying density. The normal path of light rays carrying a direct image is shown by the black line. Just like sunlight reflected downward from the upper portion of an object—for example, the top of a camel in the desert—will be directed through the cool air in the normal way. And with this mirage how can it be relate in the mirror? How can a mirror be used to explain the appearance of mirages?

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Most of the schematic figures representing the ray paths in the case of mirages are wrong. They represent smoothly bending curves, while the change of refraction index of the air above a hot ground surface like in a desert or even a highway in the summertime is confined to a thin layer. In its respect, a correct and in-scale drawing would be indistinguishable from the case of a reflection by a plane mirror.

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Mirage is more related to a prizm rather than a mirror - the rays coming from a distance object bend due to inhomogeneous air density, and thus become visible at distances where the direct rays would be blocked by the Earth's curvature.

There is however a related phenomenon that resembles a mirror: when the air is heated over a flat surface, the rays coming from teh nearby objects bend in a way that creates an impression that they are comingf rom the surface itself - it then resembles a mirror. E.g., when driving on an empty haighway on a hot day one may observe the "reflection" of the nearby trees or structures on the road ahead.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thankyouu for your answer!!! @vadim $\endgroup$ – Shell Apr 12 at 9:06
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    $\begingroup$ Your answer has been truncated at an unsuitable place $\endgroup$ – Ruslan Apr 12 at 9:59

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