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As far as i know particle accelerators are the main tools in particle physics for investigating fundamental physics. Is it possible to perform tabletop experiments, like in low energy physics lab, without using colliders for finding new physics beyond the Standard Model?

I heard that some precise measurements can do what I am asking, but how and is it reliable?

Edit: i mean experiments on lab, where there is in principle the control of the source, that doesn't involve astroparticles. I prefer to leave this in another question.

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  • $\begingroup$ scientificamerican.com/article/… $\endgroup$ – G. Smith Apr 7 at 16:58
  • $\begingroup$ Interesting, even if I was searching something without particle accelerators. $\endgroup$ – Mark_Bell Apr 7 at 17:41
  • $\begingroup$ This low-energy experiment uses a small storage ring. It would fit on a tabletop if your table were 50 feet across. They are not smashing the muons into anything. But you do need to use a small accelerator to create the muons in the first place. This is almost certainly the precise measurement you heard about. $\endgroup$ – G. Smith Apr 7 at 17:49
  • $\begingroup$ You are right. Thank you. Are there any others of this kind? Is it possible in future make more and more sophisticated measurements, avoiding bigger and bigger colliders? I think that it's impossible discover new particles without accelerators (i guess so, maybe I am wrong). But maybe there are other ways. $\endgroup$ – Mark_Bell Apr 7 at 17:59
  • $\begingroup$ Are there any others of this kind? I’m not sure. $\endgroup$ – G. Smith Apr 7 at 18:01
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There are certainly other type of experiments to detect particles. Take for example: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1475-7516/2011/06/035/meta Where dark matter signatures are searched using gamma-ray emission.

Particle detection experiments can be classified as "direct" or "indirect". In the direct experiments (such as particle collision) you're looking to see/produce the particle, whereas in indirect experiments you're looking for a clue that a particle has done something. The thing is that, direct experiments are easier to interpret, so if possible, you want to perform these.

As for finding new particles, it depends on the particle's mass. If they have high masses (such as Higgs boson), you need high energy experiments, such as collisions. If they have low mass, you really want to do other things. Take for example neutrinos, and Kamiokande or IceCube experiments.

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  • $\begingroup$ I should have write experiments that doesn't involve astroparticle physics $\endgroup$ – Mark_Bell Apr 7 at 9:19
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With any cathode ray tube you are working with a beam of electrons (some with positive ions). My college physics lab had one which operated at a very low voltage to measure, e/m, for electrons. If you have a radioactive source, a cloud chamber lets you see the tracks of individual particles.

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  • $\begingroup$ Precise measurements of the charge to mass ratio are test for Standard Model because these are fundamental constants? So I guess that deviation from the predicted values can give an hint of new physics, right? Expecially for the mass of the electron that is very small. Even if this is a very old measurement. $\endgroup$ – Mark_Bell Apr 7 at 17:27

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