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I recently asked a question at Astronomy.SE related to matter-gravitational waves interactions: https://astronomy.stackexchange.com/q/43265

From related question Do gravitational waves disperse/refract (like EM waves in a prism)?

There is also the fact that matter is transparent to gravitational waves of any frequency.

As the question does not seem to provide any references to this, this raises a few questions: What is the reason for this? Is there any specific research paper or theory that describes why this is?

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They interact weakly with matter - so it's not completely transparent to them.

To steal from an answer to another question.

"In a 1969 paper, Seismic Response of the Earth to a Gravitational Wave in the 1-Hz Band, Dyson estimated that the Earth absorbs about  $10^{-21}$ of the energy of a 1-Hz gravitational wave passing through it, and that this ratio varies as the inverse square of the frequency. LIGO detects gravitational waves with frequencies of order 100 Hz, so for them the absorption ratio would be of order $10^{-25}$." ~ G. Smith

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