0
$\begingroup$

Yeah, so, I know that objects rotate, about a point, in a chosen frame of reference. I was wondering if there is a mathematical notation that tells you the following :

  • Point of rotation of a body
  • Coordinate system describing the vector
  • body of reference or the relative body which the body of interest's angular velocity is being measured with respect to ( I don't know if angular velocity of a body relative to another is a thing, if it is I want to know how its written mathematically)

enter image description here

I stumbled across the above notation ( found here Definition of angular velocity vector of $B$ in $A$ - Strange notation) but I don't think it states the coordinate system and the point of rotation.

enter image description here

I also stumbled across the above notation (found here Definition of angular velocity vector of $B$ in $A$ - Strange notation), it has more info but I don't understand it, I googled "angular velocity notations", nothing helpful came.

If you are wondering why I want the notation to specify the point of rotation, its because I noticed that determining relative angular velocity between to bodies is dependent on their points/axis of rotation, whether they coincide or are separate.

EDIT: Found another notation here Relating angular velocity between rotating frames

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

Notation often emphasises one aspect more than another. Its often an aspect that is under consideration. For example a tangent vector can be written as:

$v$ - it's position is left implicit

$v_p$ - it's position is explicit

And this is matched by the notation for a tangent bundle

$TM$ - we are considering the whole tangent bundle

$T_pM$ - we are considering the tangent space at $p$

Obviously, this is not an exact match, as $TM$ is not a fibre where the position of the fibre is left implicit.

And this is further matched by the notation of a bundle

$E$ - we are considering the whole fibre bundle

$E_p$ - we are considering the fibre of the bundle at $p$

$\endgroup$
1
  • $\begingroup$ Hmmmmmm, wow, ok, I guess I have to create my own notation then. $\endgroup$ – Mubarak Salley Apr 4 at 15:13

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.