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I can't understand how the frictional force is the reason for both the tangential and the centripetal acceleration in a car that is rotating. I found some useful answers on how it provide one of them, but I can't visualize how it provides both at the same time.

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a) Tangential acceleration: By definition, frictional force opposes the direction of motion. For the part of the car's tire that is in contact with the ground, the friction acting is static friction unless the car is skidding (in the case of skidding, the point in contact with the ground moves along the surface). Because this point on the rim of the tire remains motionless, you can see that the frictional force opposes the direction of velocity and is tangential.

b) Centripetal accelaration: If frictional force did not exist, the wheels of the car would not turn. Through the propulsion of the engine, the car would simply slide. So, when the car wheels turn (as a result of frictional force), a point chosen along the rim of the wheel displays circular motion, which means that there must be a centripetal acceleration.

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