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If the current is same in the series circuit then what does a resistor do to really if not less the flow of electrons?

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"the current is same in the series circuit". This means that the current (rate of flow of charge) is the same all round the circuit. If 1.2 A leaves the battery, 1.2 A will be returning to it and there will be 1.2 A at intermediate points, outside and inside the battery. If you put more resistance in the circuit you reduce the current all round the circuit. So perhaps 0.8 A will leave the battery now, in which case 0.8 A will be returning to it and there will be 0.8 A at intermediate points.

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  • $\begingroup$ So what are you saying is that a resistor decrease the flow of electrons in the whole circuit how is it possible because the battery is giving the potential difference first in the wire and the resistor is in the middle of the wire how can a resistor slows the current flow in the beggining can you please elaborate $\endgroup$ Mar 13 at 18:01
  • $\begingroup$ Fewer electrons per second are passing through the resistor per second (than would pass through the wire without the resistor), so fewer are being recycled to the battery per second and fewer are going through the battery and coming back out of the negative terminal per second. [ Electrons can't pile up anywhere in the circuit, because of mutual repulsion.] $\endgroup$ Mar 13 at 19:21
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I usually think of current as a flowing fluid and a pipe valve as a resistor. If you close the valve completely (have a pure resistor), then no flow (no current). If you completely open the valve as if it's not there, then infinite flow (infinite current). If you partially close/open the valve, there's a slight "resistance" on the flowing fluid, requiring more time for it to travel across. Although it takes more time to allow the fluid to flow through the valve, the incoming and outgoing amount of fluid is always the same --- it's just the rate of which it moves is slower.

Going through a resistor, an electron will experience thermal loss (heat) so the resistor will physically get hotter. Thinking about it in this sense, you would intuitively think "if it loses energy after entering a resistor, it'll come out with less energy and therefore less current"--- no. The electron is a lazy guy... they'll always take the path of least resistance (they don't work hard, they work smart).

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  • $\begingroup$ I have a question so what is resistance doing then just giving more time to the flow of electrons to flow they loose their energy and after coming back to the conductor they regain their energy with the help of potential difference what is resistance really doing if it is giving time (lag) in the circuit the circuit will break because electrons will accumulate and the wire will burst $\endgroup$ Mar 13 at 17:53
  • $\begingroup$ Resistors are designed for specific voltages (potential difference). So if the electron "pressure" (or voltage) is too high, then the resistor itself will physically burn up due to all the thermal energy. There is an amount of pressure for resistors to work and allow some flow of electrons through it. Electrons go into the resistor and then "shoot out" on the other side like water, but like water coming out of a dam, it'll come back to its normal flow rate when it exists and enters the river. $\endgroup$ Mar 18 at 4:34

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