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Let us take a closed container completely filled with some liquid.Let us assume that the container moves with some acceleration in the horizontal direction.

Usually when we have such situations,we take the liquid to be slanted so that it remains in equilibrium and ensure that the liquid surface is perpendicular to the force exerted on the liquid

But in this case,if it is fully filled,how can it be slanted? How does it manage to remain in equilibrium?

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  • $\begingroup$ I think the question is potentially ill-posed? If the container is full, and the liquid is incompressible, then there is no literally no difference on the macropscopic properties between that and a uniform rod. Perhaps you need to add more details? $\endgroup$ Mar 31 at 19:55

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Assuming that the container is filled but not pressurized, and is being accelerated to the right, then the pressure along the upper right edge is one atmosphere. Going down from the upper surface, the pressure increases as expected: ΔP = ρg(Δy), (with positive y down). Going to the left from the right side it increases as: ΔP = ρa(Δx), (with positive x to the left). All surfaces will be exerting forces on the liquid.

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If the fluid is incompressible, the intermolecular forces will just balance the apparent force caused by the acceleration I would say. I think the slanting happens because assuming density stays the same the liquid has to find a way to compensate for the acceleration and that's the most favorable way.

If, however, the liquid's density can change, it will so the container will not be completely filled anymore.

I'm not sure though, so I'd appreciate some input by others.

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