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If a simple circuit is built with an DC source,an output resistor and an input source (I mean transformer or something through which signals can be passed through this circuit),will it work as an amplifier?

I know this is really a dumb question but just wanted to know if it will work or not. Some of you might get angry at this...I am really sorry for that😓

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    $\begingroup$ Please read about OpAmps (operational amplifiers). $\endgroup$ – Semoi Feb 17 at 18:16
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    $\begingroup$ Would Electrical Engineering be a better home for this question? $\endgroup$ – Qmechanic Feb 17 at 18:20
  • $\begingroup$ Sir @semoi will it be amplified in the above scenario? Or a transistor is a must for amplification? $\endgroup$ – Mohammad Sakib Shahriar Feb 17 at 18:22
  • $\begingroup$ the transformer you mention can amplify the AC voltage, is that what you mean? $\endgroup$ – trula Feb 17 at 18:57
  • $\begingroup$ @MohammadSakibShahriar a transformer can increase the voltage of the signal with reduced current, or vice versa. But it will never amplify the power of the signal. $\endgroup$ – The Photon Feb 17 at 18:58
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I think by "simple" you mean Linear, which would consist of Source, R/L/C, and Transformers. Or as Engineers tend to label them "Electrical Circuits" as opposed to "Electronic Circuits" which have transistors/diodes. These circuits can have their responses written in terms of Linear ODEs.

The definitions get tricky, because as noted in the comments, you can have elements like an Op-Amp which we treat linearly, but it is actually composed on non-linear elements, in fact in the true sense the linear treatment of the op-amp is just an approximation.

If your question is strictly regarding amplifying the power of a signal using only linear elements, then no it cannot be done. You can try to understand this by viewing linearity of a circuit as equivalent to this statement "the R/L/C of each element does not change for a change in input voltage or current", and so of course that prohibits us from amplification.

However, we can introduce new elements with their own Transfer Functions (such as the Op-Amp) that perform linear amplification for us just the same. Notice though you cannot write the response of an Op-Amp in terms of an nth order Linear ODE, but you can when it is hooked up in some configuration that we use our Linear approximation for.

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  • $\begingroup$ Won't theexternal signal input have any impact on the output as it as a dc circuit? $\endgroup$ – Mohammad Sakib Shahriar Feb 17 at 19:56

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