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Could we have the same speed in water with two beams of light and matter?

Or the speed of light of the light beam and matter beam both equal 225,000,000 m / s in water.

the photon goes at the speed of light in a vacuum or water, but not its wave which goes at a speed C / n, and if the electron goes at the same speed as the wave of light in the water in the same space-time, the two quantum probability equations will give rise to a single equation.

And in this quantum equation the quantum overlap will allow the electron to go faster than C and photon to go slower than C.

And you can test my say by this experience.

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  • $\begingroup$ It is not helpful to describe the propagation of light in matter as photons. $\endgroup$ – user137289 Feb 17 at 11:15
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I dont know what you mean by the two equations will become one equation.

But in general, yes. There is a process called cherenkov radiation where, if a charged particle (ie an electron) moves faster than the speed of light in that material, then you get a flash of light (if you use a classical electric field this flash is equivalent to the sonic boom when matter moves faster than the speed of sound).

In fact, this is how we detect neutrinos: the neutrino isn't slowed down by the water and so is moving faster than light does in the material (but not faster than light in a vacuum). The neutrino has no charge and so doesnt interact with light, however, if it hits an electron then it can make the electron go faster than light and cause the flash

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  • $\begingroup$ two quantum probability equations that of the photon and that of the electron, there is no cherenkov radiation effect, because the electron and the photon wave go at the same speed. $\endgroup$ – Extrazlove Feb 16 at 16:52
  • $\begingroup$ @Extrazlove this makes no sense. The wave preperty of both the electron and the photon are probability waves, (for the photon because the quantized maxwell equation is used for determining its wavefunction, also builds up the classical electromagnetic wave). Electrons can move with velocity higher the the velocity of light (classical electromagnetism) in the medium **and can emit Cerenkov radiation. $\endgroup$ – anna v Feb 17 at 8:58
  • $\begingroup$ there is a difference between a photon and electron the photon has no mass it can be everywhere at the same time before the measurement but the electron not because it has a mass that forces it to respect the limit of light. Here in this experiment the electromagnetic wave of the photon and the electron go at the same speed in the same space time. And quantum chauvinism will give birth to a unique equation of probability where the electron behaves like a photon and the photon like an electron and with that we can send information faster than light in a vacuum not just in a vacuum water. $\endgroup$ – Extrazlove Feb 17 at 9:46
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The photon goes at the speed of light in a vacuum or water,

The photon is an elementary particle with mass zero. All zero mass elementary particles travel in vacuum with the velocity of classical electromagnentic waves,light , c, because of the Lorenz covariance of the quantum field theory. Light is an emergent phenomenon from a large number of photons, as can be seen experimentally here.

but not its wave which goes at a speed C / n,

The photon as an elementary quantum particle has a wave function, but the wave dependence for the photon is in the probability distribution for detecting it (as in the single photon experiment linked above), not in space. The emergent classical electromagnetic wave, light, from the same energy photons displays an energy distribution as a function of space coordinates.

and if the electron goes at the same speed as the wave of light in the water

If the electron goes at the speed or more of light in water, it emits cerenkov radiation as explained in the answer of Toby.

in the same space-time,

Two elementary particles, as a photon and an electron, in the same space time interact and the probability of interaction is calculable in quantum electrodynamics, so this you describe cannot happen:

the two quantum probability equations will give rise to a single equation.

The photon beam and the electron beam, to be beams, will always be governed by two independent quantum probability equations

And in this quantum equation the quantum overlap will allow the electron to go faster than C and photon to go slower than C.

The photon always goes at c. It is the emergent classical wave that can have velocity lower than c in a medium. The classical wave is a state defined by quantum mechanics in a complicated way, as the superposition of photons, and needs quantum field theory to be understood, see here.

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  • $\begingroup$ there is a difference between a photon and electron the photon has no mass it can be everywhere at the same time before the measurement but the electron not because it has a mass that forces it to respect the limit of light. Here in this experiment the electromagnetic wave of the photon and the electron go at the same speed in the same space time. And quantum chauvinism will give birth to a unique probability equation where the electron behaves like a photon and the photon like an electron and with that we can send information faster than light in a vacuum. $\endgroup$ – Extrazlove Feb 17 at 9:54
  • $\begingroup$ here in this experiment the electron and the electromagnetic wave of the photon go at the same speed and they are in the same space time no cerenkov effect. But the electron will behave like a photon and even go with a speed greater than C and the photon will slow down less than C. And you can experimentally test this experience to test my say $\endgroup$ – Extrazlove Feb 17 at 9:59
  • $\begingroup$ If this is an imaginary experiment you propose, it cannot happen in our world as far as mainstream physics go. The photon has no electromagnetic wave, just energy and momentum and spin, it is a point particle in the standard model. You are talking science fiction $\endgroup$ – anna v Feb 17 at 10:41

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