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I am working with some polymers that behave like semiconductors when they are plugged into the current.

I am calculating the mobility of these polymers and I need the value of the current density (J) in order to achieve it.

I have found that the current density is the sum of the Jp+Jn.

Therefore, since for an intrinsic semiconductor the number of n and p is the same, then for Jp should I divide the total J by 2 or does this only apply to inorganic semiconductors?

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  • $\begingroup$ Polymer semiconductors really aren't my thing, but the conduction mechanisms are decidedly different along a molecule backbone vs in a crystal. However, even in, say, silicon, the electron and hole currents are not necessarily equal, since the mobility of the two is different. $\endgroup$
    – Jon Custer
    Feb 11 at 16:01
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The equal number of free electrons and holes is a general property of intrinsic semiconductors. It does not matter whether kind of material you consider.

However, the same volumetric density does not imply the same electron/hole current. They might have different mobilities according to each particular material.

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