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or are they talking about different things and I'm to stupid to see that?

first website: https://www.britannica.com/science/Lorentz-force quote: "the magnetic force on both types of charge carriers is in the same direction."

second website: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lorentz_force quote: "Positive and negative charge trajectories curve in opposite directions."

Seems like those contradict each other but it could be because one is talking about charges in a wire, and one of those charges is like electron holes which are only theoretical? idk

Also in a tokamak I was wondering if the positive nucleus and the striped of negative electrons are flying around in opposite directions, and if they are, and that makes them collide a bunch, would there be fusion between them? Is fusion only a nucleus on nucleus thing?

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As is always the case, you must evaluate the quote in context. In the Encyclopedia Britannica article, the sentence before your quote is

A current flowing from right to left in a conductor can be the result of positive charge carriers moving from right to left or negative charges moving from left to right, or some combination of each.

Therefore, what they're saying is that the magnetic force on a positive charge moving toward the left is the same as the magnetic force on a negative charge moving toward the right, because both the velocity $\mathbf v$ and the sign of the charge $q$ are reversed - leaving $\mathbf F_B = q\mathbf v \times \mathbf B$ unchanged.

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  • $\begingroup$ Gotta love math. Today it was blowing my mind again that the force on the wire would be the same whether it's electrons moving or electron holes, but just look at the equation and logic it out, negate v and negate q and that adds up to (-1)(-1) = +1 => no change in the sign on F $\endgroup$
    – user273872
    Feb 16, 2021 at 0:05

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