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We all know that moving electric charges produce magnetic fields. Gravity is said to be equivalent to acceleration which implies movement. Does this mean that an outside observer will see an electric charge within a gravity field as a magnet?

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Yes. A charged particle being accelerated in a gravitational field will produce a magnetic field.

A moving charged particle is a current by definition. And electric currents produce magnetic fields. In fact, a charged particle being accelerated will produce electromagnetic radiation.

As you stated, this is something observed from the frame of reference of a stationary inertial observer (“outside observer” as you stated). In the frame of reference of the charge, you will see a static electric field.

outside observer will see an electric charge within a gravity field as a magnet?

Here, you mean “magnetic field” and not “magnet”. A magnet is an object that produces a magnetic field on its own, without the requirement of an accelerating field.

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  • $\begingroup$ Very interesting! I had thought so. What I'm really looking for here is a formula linking gravity to magnetic field. For example what kind of field will you expect from mass m of charge q? Also what form would the magnetic field look like to the outside observer? For instance would it equivalent to a charge moving away from the observer or something else? $\endgroup$ Feb 7, 2021 at 4:49
  • $\begingroup$ Hello Derek. It is not recommended that questions be answered in comments - these are site rules. And this question will be of interest to a larger audience. So I would instruct you to post a new question - and include a link to this question (for context). If I see it I’ll be keen to answer it. Cheers. $\endgroup$
    – joseph h
    Feb 7, 2021 at 6:04

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