0
$\begingroup$

I started self learning mathematics and physics .. but the thing is I can't join a college , but I watch online lectures and read textbooks instead .. I am interested in theoritical physics .. But I dont know if working on theories without formal education in a college accepted or not?

$\endgroup$
2
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I’m voting to close this question because it is not about physics $\endgroup$ – Dale Feb 2 at 1:02
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ This would probably be a better fit on Academia. $\endgroup$ – Sandejo Feb 2 at 1:30
2
$\begingroup$

There are far more journals than there used to be, and getting a paper accepted by one of them is far easier than it used to be. But this is because many journals now are low-quality. Even with a degree it is not necessarily easy to get published in a top-quality journal.

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

Yes, it's possible.

Fair warning though, the barrier to entry is hard, and there's a good chance you won't be able to find anything worth publishing as a self-educated physicist. There's a reason why the traditional path to research is by doing a PhD - it's a skill you need to learn, and something that is best learned from someone experienced (i.e. a professor).

$\endgroup$
4
  • $\begingroup$ Is it because of lack of scientific information on the internet or because doing research is a skill that cannot be self taught . $\endgroup$ – Ahmed Mokhtar Feb 2 at 0:52
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ @AhmedMokhtar the latter, research is a skill that cannot be self-taught very well. It's certainly possible, but for the vast majority of people it will not work. $\endgroup$ – Allure Feb 2 at 0:57
  • 5
    $\begingroup$ @AhmedMokhtar It is not lack of information on the internet. It is because there is far too much "information" for any single individual to figure out for themselves what "information" is actually useful, what is just plain wrong, and what is crackpot nonsense. If you don't know what other researchers in the same field are working on, and what the interesting unanswered questions are, you are very unlikely to produce anything the rest of the scientific community cares about. $\endgroup$ – alephzero Feb 2 at 1:18
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ It can often take many months of effort to make a small-but-measurable amount of progress on a research-level question. A very big risk is that you will go in a direction that others won't find interesting, or that was already done before, or already shown to be impossible... This is really where @alphazero's comment comes into play. You simply can't understand everything that's been written in any field at the level you need to in order to make a contribution, so you have to have a good idea in advance what is going to be worth working on... That's what an advisor should help you with. $\endgroup$ – Andrew Feb 2 at 1:47

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.