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From Phys.org:

Light-controlled Higgs modes found in superconductors; potential sensor, computing uses.

Trillion-pulse laser

The mode can be accessed and controlled by laser light flashing on the superconductor at terahertz frequencies of trillions of pulses per second.

Sorry to ask such a simple question, but does the 'on-off' pulse duration always have to match the frequency?

So that a trillion-pulse-per-second laser is also, always, of terahetz-frequency?

Also, even a continuous laser is still sort of 'on-off', because of the inherent oscillation of the light wave, right?

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The “terahertz” here refers to the frequency of the light. I checked out their paper, and their pulses have photon energies spanning ~1-8 meV. These pulses are broadband, with frequencies in this range.

The THz frequency is not to be confused with the repetition rate of their laser, which is 1 kHz. So they get 1000 pulses per second, and each pulse is broadband with electric field oscillations in the THz range. Their pulses probably actually have a single E-field wiggle a couple of hundred femtoseconds wide.

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