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As we know, there is an equation for gravitational force

$$F = \frac{Gm_1m_2}{R^2}$$

While for electromagnetism, it is $$F = q(E + v × B)$$ So is there any true formula to find the weak and strong force?

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Yes. In modern physics, one formulates the forces in terms of energy rather than force, as a scalar theory seems to have many advantages over a vector theory.

In 1935, quantum physicist Hideki Yukawa showed that the nuclear potential is of the form,

$$V_{\text{Yukawa}} \left( r \right) = -\frac{g^2}{r} e^ {- \mu r} $$

Where $r$ is radial distance from the interacting particle, $g$ is a scaling constant and $\mu = \alpha m$ is the particle's Yukawa mass ($\alpha$ is another scaling constant).

Coming to the weak nuclear interaction - it is, as the word suggests, better described as an 'interaction' than as a 'force'. There are various kinds of weak nuclear interactions, and finding a general structure in them requires rigorous knowledge of the electroweak theory (which unifies the weak nuclear interaction and quantum electrodynamics).

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  • $\begingroup$ thanks a lot!! got it !! $\endgroup$ Feb 5 at 4:27

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