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I wonder something. Imagine I have one electron that is stationary and a light beam is pointed into it. As light is an electromagnetic wave which is consisting of oscillating, perpendicular E and B fields, I think that electron will feel a force on it due to electric field of the light beam that passes through it. However, what I really wonder is that if the light beam is pointed right to the electron(passes by it), is the electron still affected by E field of the beam. In animations I see that E field vector goes up and down in a 2D plane as the beam propagates. However, my electron is not located on that plane and therefore there is no flux line goes through it or is there? I am terrible at understanding vectors especially when we move them around without changing directions etc. Can you explain the situation?

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In a plane polarized electromagnetic wave, the E oscillates back and forth (in a particular perpendicular direction) at each point in the path of the wave. This will cause the electron to oscillate (in the same direction) with it's maximum acceleration (and displacement) when E is at a maximum. As it moves with the E field, it will also be subject to an oscillation due to its interaction with the B field.

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