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I have a very simple question about the double slit experiment with electrons.

Does some electron does not pass through the slits at all?

All explanations I read about the experiment demonstrate the wave behavior of the electrons that pass the slits and show the wave interference on the screen. But it does not mention if some electron hit the material used to do the slit.

Because I understood that the wave function is about the probability of presence of the electron so it may have a probability that the electron doesn't pass through any slits and hit the material. Is it correct?

Sorry if the question has already been answered but I did not manage to formulate it correctly so the search engine give me relevant results.

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Simple analogy: look at a beam of light hitting a 2-slit aperture. You can see lots of light being reflected off the solid parts of the aperture plate.

I suspect your confusion started when someone said that, quantum mechanically, an electron passes thru both slits and interferes with itself (which is true). This is where we run into the brain-twist of the electron (or a photon) being both a particle and a wave. Experiments have shown that the 2-slit diffraction pattern is produced even when a stream of single photons is the source.

But in all cases, lots of particles (or a high percentage of the wave) hit the plate and don't go thru the slits at all.

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"Because I understood that the wave function is about the probability of presence of the electron so it may have a probability that the electron doesn't pass through any slits and hit the material. Is it correct ?"

That is entirely correct.

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