0
$\begingroup$

Can the units of $$\frac{e\,c}{2\pi\,f},$$ where $c$ is the speed of light, $e$ is the elementary charge and $f$ is the frequency, be correct for the magnetic moment?

I see that the units of magnetic moment should be $\text A \text m^2$ but when I look at this solution, it goes

$$\frac{\text C \frac{\text m}{\text s}}{\frac 1 s} = \frac{\text C}{\text s} \text m \text s = \text A \text m \text s.$$

Am I missing something or is this paper wrong? I am hoping the paper is correct and I am just missing something. Thanks

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/281266794_Magnetic_Moment_of_Photon

$\endgroup$
4
  • $\begingroup$ Wolfram says its electric dipole moment $\endgroup$
    – R. Emery
    Jan 9, 2021 at 8:28
  • $\begingroup$ Even if the relevant equation appears in the abstract, you should paraphrase or directly quote (with citation) the segment of the paper you are referencing since not everyone might have access to this site. $\endgroup$
    – Triatticus
    Jan 9, 2021 at 8:41
  • $\begingroup$ Hi R. Emery, thanks! that's what i was looking for! i'll upvote your comment and mark it as correct once i can. $\endgroup$ Jan 9, 2021 at 15:13
  • $\begingroup$ I looked briefly at that paper and am skeptical about its quality. (Actually I’m skeptical about the quality of anything published by Scientific Research Publishing.) I suggest also reading this paper about the photon magnetic moment. $\endgroup$
    – G. Smith
    Jan 9, 2021 at 18:20

1 Answer 1

-1
$\begingroup$

Wolfram says that

$$\frac{e\,c}{2\pi\,f}$$

is electric dipole moment

$\endgroup$
3
  • $\begingroup$ This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. - From Review $\endgroup$ Jan 10, 2021 at 9:48
  • $\begingroup$ I already did and he said it was the answer he was looking for. @GiorgioP $\endgroup$
    – R. Emery
    Jan 10, 2021 at 14:23
  • $\begingroup$ An answer should be something more than just a yes/no. A few words of explanation why you think that it is correct would make your post a real answer. Authority principle, even in the case of Wolfram, cannot be considered a strong argument. $\endgroup$ Jan 10, 2021 at 18:55

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.