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I'm new to quantum mechanics, and I was wondering what actually is a potential barrier in quantum mechanics?

I understand that it is similar in a way to a hill in classical mechanics except that we get a decreasing exponential for too high energy for the probability density instead of a 0 and so on, but experimentally how to make a setup, for example, for the electron to go though a potential barrier?

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    $\begingroup$ the grid of a triode biased to a negative voltage relative to the cathode is a potential barrier between the cathode and the positive anode. $\endgroup$ – hyportnex Jan 8 at 14:00
  • $\begingroup$ thank you! how to accept an answer on this website? $\endgroup$ – nobody48sheldor Jan 8 at 14:03
  • $\begingroup$ @nobody48sheldor You haven't gotten any answer. These are comments. $\endgroup$ – Roger Jan 8 at 14:04
  • $\begingroup$ ah ok, well thanks for the help anyway, i m new to the site. $\endgroup$ – nobody48sheldor Jan 8 at 14:07
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    $\begingroup$ @hyportnex. Please, post your comment as an answer. It helps further searches in case of similar question. $\endgroup$ – DanielC Jan 8 at 15:43
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An easy example of a quantum mechanical potential barrier in an experimental setup is a scanning tunneling microscope. A voltage is applied between a solid crystal you want to scan and a tip. The space between tip and solid can be interpreted as a potential barrier, as removing an electron from the tip and placing it in this intermediate space would require energy, just like rolling a ball up a hill requires energy.

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