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I've been watching Susskind's lectures on string theory and M-theory. He mentioned in video 3 that string theory initially had tachyons but that this was fixed early on in string theory's development. I'm wondering how precisely one can get rid of tachyonic fields (fields with negative mass squared) in string theory. I see from other questions that increasing the dimensions may somehow get rid of the tachyons. If so, how? What would be some good sources (such as review articles or videos) for me to learn more about how one can remove tachyons from a theory?

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    $\begingroup$ Take a read of arxiv.org/abs/1201.0981 (by Schwarz himself) for a nontechnical historical review (a short answer to the question comes in section 6). I'm not sure how satisfactory the answer is overall, but it definitely gives you the resources to go and find more. $\endgroup$ – Eletie Dec 1 '20 at 14:38
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Tachyons are typical for the bosonic string. If you require supersymmetry, i. e. consider superstrings, then there are no tachyons in the theory.

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  • $\begingroup$ Yes, but why? Do they just not occur in the first place, or are they removed by some mathematical operation? $\endgroup$ – PrawwarP Dec 3 '20 at 9:54
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    $\begingroup$ they simply do not occur in the mass spectrum. $\endgroup$ – Oбжорoв Dec 3 '20 at 12:47

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