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I'm trying to understand the electric displacement field $\mathbf{D}$ for a lossy material with conductivity $\sigma$ and permittivity $\epsilon$.

Most textbooks I've looked at only consider perfect dielectrics when discussing $\mathbf{D}$. However, the first two sentences of the Wikipedia article on $\mathbf{D}$ state

In physics, the electric displacement field (denoted by D) or electric induction is a vector field that appears in Maxwell's equations. It accounts for the effects of free and bound charge within materials.

But then in the next section (as in most textbooks), $\mathbf{D}$ is defined as \begin{align} \mathbf{D} = \epsilon_0\mathbf{E} + \mathbf{P}.\tag{1}\label{eq} \end{align} Now clearly $\mathbf{P}$ accounts for only bound charges. So what accounts for free charges? If the Wikipedia quote is indeed true, shouldn't $\sigma$ appear somewhere in (\ref{eq})?

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Displacement field $\mathbf D$ is defined by $$ \mathbf D = \epsilon_0 \mathbf E + \mathbf P. $$

Statement "accounts for the effects of free and bound charge" is a weird, probably incorrect statement, because just giving values of components of $D_x, D_y, D_z$ in some region of space does not give us enough information on the bound charge. It does give us information on free charge, because its density obeys the equation

$$ \nabla \cdot \mathbf D = \rho_f $$ or in other way $$ \frac{\partial D_x}{\partial x} + \frac{\partial D_y}{\partial y} + \frac{\partial D_z}{\partial z} = \rho_f. $$

A correct statement would be that value of $\mathbf D$ at some point of space is influenced both by free and bound charge. This is because (in electrostatics) $\mathbf E$ is function of total charge density in all space, and $\mathbf P$ is function of how bound charge density is shifted from its neutral position (and in the simple cases, can be determined from bound charge distribution and boundary conditions for $\mathbf P$).

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