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Also, does this phenomenon apply only to lasers, or also to other EM beams?

I wonder if the answer is related to the fact that diffraction limit(s) are proportional to wavelengths...

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I wonder if the answer is related to the fact that diffraction limit(s) are proportional to wavelengths...

Exactly.

The beam diverges because it diffracts as it exits the output aperture.

The diffraction angle depends on the optical wavelength and increases as the wavelength increases.

does this phenomenon apply only to lasers, or also to other EM beams?

It's a general feature of EM beams. And other wave phenomena, for that matter.

For example, the directivity of a radio antenna depends on the ratio of the antenna diameter to the wavelength.

And the directivity (if that's what audio guys call it) of a loudspeaker depends on the ratio of the speaker cone diameter to the audio wavelength (also why you can hear the difference if your tweeters are moved around but not if your woofers are moved).

And for that matter the uncertainty of knowing a quantum particle's momentum is inversely related to how precisely you have measured (or fixed) its position.

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    $\begingroup$ @G.Smith. This isn't an academic paper. We can be a bit informal here. Please don't edit my posts unless I've made an actual incorrect statement. $\endgroup$
    – The Photon
    Commented Nov 20, 2020 at 18:24
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    $\begingroup$ @G.Smith, "guys" is used as a non-gendered term by many native speakers. $\endgroup$
    – The Photon
    Commented Nov 20, 2020 at 18:41

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