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We can travel to the past and future then we can know the future at present moment (traveled in the future , knew everything and back again to the past). Then how can we say that we have free will? We have to perform the event which we seen from the future?

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    $\begingroup$ What makes you think that time travel (into the past) is possible? $\endgroup$
    – jng224
    Nov 10, 2020 at 17:27
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    $\begingroup$ And what makes you think we have free will even without time travel? $\endgroup$
    – Dale
    Nov 10, 2020 at 17:54
  • $\begingroup$ @Jonas it could be through 3+1 dimensional worm holes. Like in condensed matter TRS protected topological insulators can form 2 Dirac points, one particle can travel through one 1 Dirac point and come back from another. Maybe there could be a similar situation in general relativity. $\endgroup$
    – Jon Du
    Nov 10, 2020 at 20:30

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Not exactly. We can only 'time travel' into the future. We can't go back in time. According to einstein's theory of space-time relativity, space and time are related. So, the faster you move through space, the faster you move through time. So if your speed increases, the way 'time' passes around you seems faster. But to people looking at you, they see you just going slower, if that makes sense.

So to travel into the future, you'd need to go at a positive speed. But to go backwards, you'd need to go at a negative speed, and that isn't possible.

Suppose you had a machine that would get you going very, very fast, and person A was inside it. Person B is outside of it. Person A is watching a timer outside the machine, and it seems twice as fast. Person B, however, is watching a timer inside the machine, and it seems twice as slow.

If you wanted to jump forward five years, then at a very, very fast speed it would only seem like one year to you. To you, you go in the machine for a year, come out, and it's 2025. But to everyone else, you just go inside a machine and come out five years later.

So the answer is no, you would not be able to deny free will, because time traveling forward is just an illusion.

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