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I had struggle to find the answer to this question: Imagine two charged identical particles, one stationary relative to earth, and the other one is free falling (to earth). We know that an accelerated charged particle radiates. But the real problem is, according to Newton, the free falling particle will radiate but with Einstein's relativity, the stationary one will radiate. (I'm not sure about this, correct me if I'm wrong).
Can anyone explain which one is correct?

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  • $\begingroup$ It would be worth pointing out that the stationary particle is also being accelerated towards the earth assuming both begin near the same position in space. $\endgroup$ – Elliot Nov 1 '20 at 11:56
  • $\begingroup$ @Elliot I didn't understand your comment. Are you talking in the context of general relativity? Can you elaborate more? $\endgroup$ – Amirhosein Rezaee Nov 1 '20 at 12:06
  • $\begingroup$ If your calculations were depending on only one particle being accelerated you might be missing something as they are both being accelerated near the earth. $\endgroup$ – Elliot Nov 1 '20 at 19:33
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    $\begingroup$ Also physics.stackexchange.com/questions/468384/… $\endgroup$ – ProfRob Nov 1 '20 at 19:45
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    $\begingroup$ I find I was incorrect. When in free fall objects are not under acceleration themselves as they are moving along. $\endgroup$ – Elliot Nov 1 '20 at 21:45
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These two links were super-helpful:
Does an classical charge that is stationary in a gravitational field radiate?
Does a charged particle accelerating in a gravitational field radiate?

I did not copy anything from these two, so that the full credit would go to the original links.

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