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Some people said if it is originated from electrons then it is X-ray but if it is originated from the nucleus it is gamma ray. But people can produce X-rays and gamma rays via Bremsstrahlung process and in Bremsstrahlung process it is resulted from decelerating or braking electrons. So, gamma rays produced via Bremsstrahlung are more similar to X-rays as it is produced by electrons. Why people still calling them gamma rays although it is not generated from the nucleus?

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    $\begingroup$ Note that Hermes III is considered a gamma simulator. It makes x-rays of an energy appropriate to simulate an intense gamma environment. $\endgroup$
    – Jon Custer
    Oct 16 '20 at 18:04
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    $\begingroup$ But, yes, people get sloppy with the terminology. Also different disciplines use different terminology. $\endgroup$
    – Jon Custer
    Oct 16 '20 at 18:05
  • $\begingroup$ @JonCuster that's what I'm thinking about, the radiation that HERMES III generated is more of a very high energy hard X-ray which energy overlap with 22 MeV gamma ray. $\endgroup$
    – SnoopyKid
    Oct 17 '20 at 1:54
  • $\begingroup$ @PM2Ring you said "Bremsstrahlung is braking radiation. It is any radiation produced due to the acceleration of a charged particle." so we can say Bremsstrahlung radiation is kind of neither X-ray nor gamma ray but the energies produced are very varied that they can encompass the whole energy levels of EM spectrum? $\endgroup$
    – SnoopyKid
    Oct 17 '20 at 1:56
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    $\begingroup$ @MohamedObeidallah Yes, Bremsstrahlung radiation can be produced in any part of the EM spectrum. Usually, Bremsstrahlung refers to the radiation given off by a charged particle travelling through an EM field, but in a sense, the EM emitted by an electron changing orbitals is also due to the acceleration of a charged particle. The same applies to a proton changing energy levels inside a nucleus, and I guess it even applies to a positron & electron annihilating each other. $\endgroup$
    – PM 2Ring
    Oct 17 '20 at 3:10
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Gamma rays and x-rays are both electromagnetic. Gamma rays have a shorter wavelength and more energetic photons. Each is identified by the range of wavelengths rather than the source.

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    $\begingroup$ This is not completely true, but discipline specific. See physics.stackexchange.com/questions/509620/… for example. $\endgroup$
    – Jon Custer
    Oct 16 '20 at 18:06
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    $\begingroup$ What Jon said. The modern convention is to distinguish x-rays from gamma rays by their origin, not their energy. However, astronomy & astrophysics still tend to use the older convention based on energy (or wavelength), so EM of >100 keV is called gamma rays. That's partly because it can be difficult to discover the mechanism of an astronomical EM source. $\endgroup$
    – PM 2Ring
    Oct 16 '20 at 19:39

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