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If your answer was that the sun's atmosphere absorbs some photons, I don't think so. Because the atom, after absorbing a photon, it seeks stability and emits an electron in a short time compared to the time the light reaches the Earth. If I am wrong, correct me.

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  • $\begingroup$ the atom, after absorbing a photon, it seeks stability and emits an electron Did you mean photon? $\endgroup$
    – Gert
    Commented Oct 5, 2020 at 21:00
  • $\begingroup$ sorry. yes i mean photon. $\endgroup$
    – bilal
    Commented Oct 6, 2020 at 17:14

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The atoms in the Sun's atmosphere that are excited by absorbing photons will indeed de-excite by emitting photons. But an emitted photon won't usually be emitted in the same direction that the absorbed photon was travelling. So if the absorbed photon were travelling towards the Earth, the emitted photon almost certainly won't be. Hence the dark absorption line.

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    $\begingroup$ Also, the OP wrote: the atom, after absorbing a photon, it seeks stability and emits an electron, which is of course also incorrect. +1 from me. $\endgroup$
    – Gert
    Commented Oct 5, 2020 at 20:54
  • $\begingroup$ I hadn't spotted that! I'd guess that the OP meant photon. $\endgroup$ Commented Oct 5, 2020 at 20:56

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