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So here is a thought, lets fix a cube of side 1cm, it contains light passing through it from all possible angles, be it stars or insect. If we change our angle of view we can see different objects due to the infinite information passing through it in forms of photons. (By using microscope we can even extract more information from that cube)

Wouldn't that imply that a small unit cube has infinite information passing through it and which is not altering other information ?

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  • $\begingroup$ A finite number of photons pass through the cube in any given time interval. There is not infinite information passing through. $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Oct 9 at 18:04
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Photons have momentum and energy so by GR there can only be so many photons above a certain energy in a volume before it collapses into a black hole.

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  • $\begingroup$ How about the photons altering the wave nature of each other, because there are countless photons(information) within a finite space. $\endgroup$ – pankaj pundir Oct 5 at 15:28
  • $\begingroup$ That is just incompatible with GR. There is a finite limit to the amount of energy per volume before a black hole forms. Every photon has some energy $\endgroup$ – J Kusin Oct 5 at 15:53
  • $\begingroup$ means there should be a limit to what we can see through microscope or telescope using a fixed volume of space. Also information within a space is limited to a finite number such that it will not alter other photons wave. Because If photons are interacting then, our reality will be a lot distorting while observing from telescope or microscope. $\endgroup$ – pankaj pundir Oct 6 at 18:02
  • $\begingroup$ Bekenstein bound = finite energy in a region then finite information. GR gives an upper limit of energy in a region before it collapses into a black hole. More energy -> bigger black hole. So no infinite information in any finite region, unless quantum gravity changes things $\endgroup$ – J Kusin Oct 6 at 18:45

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