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I want to ask whether mass changes to charge or any other form in beta plus decay or minus decay because in beta plus decay up quark changes to down quark with formation of positron and neutrino, here charges are same on both sides but mass on the right hand size increases than left side. So from where that mass comes from? I am confused about it. Please someone explain me how it happens.

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  • $\begingroup$ Your question is a little unclear. Could you rewrite it so it is easier to understand? Thanks. $\endgroup$ – Yejus Oct 4 '20 at 13:14
  • $\begingroup$ well I am saying that in beta plus decay up quark changes to down quark with positron and neutrino. $\endgroup$ – Susmit Oct 5 '20 at 13:48
  • $\begingroup$ and equation is like [ up quark -----> down quark + positron + neutrino ] here charge is conserved both side because charge of up quark is [2/3e] and charge of down quark is [-1/3e] and charge of positron is [e] and neutrino particle is neutral. But mass is very much high at right side as compared to left side mass of up quark is [2.2MeV/(cc)], mass of down quark is [4.7MeV/(cc)] mass of positron is [0.511MeV/(c*c)] and mass of neutrino is negligible. So, how mass increases in this process. $\endgroup$ – Susmit Oct 5 '20 at 13:58
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I want to ask whether mass changes to charge or any other form in beta plus decay or minus decay because in beta plus decay up quark changes to down quark with formation of positron and neutrino, here charges are same on both sides but mass on the right hand size increases than left side. So from where that mass comes from? I am confused about it. Please someone explain me how it happens.

Mass and Charge are different things. They do not convert into each other.

What happens in general is that total charge is conserved. That is, the total charge of all particles involved in the interaction before and after is the same.

Mass does not have to conserved. This can be confusing as it is common to teach that mass is conserved in early high school. On an everyday level mass does seem to be conserved, but in atomic and quantum physics this is not true. Mass is a form of energy and all that is required is that the total energy before and after of (again) all particles taken together is the same.

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  • $\begingroup$ So how they increase does the energy in the surrounding is converted into mass or something else happens ? $\endgroup$ – Susmit Oct 5 '20 at 14:01
  • $\begingroup$ Conversion of mass to and from energy is result of Einstein's $E=mc^2$ equation. $\endgroup$ – StephenG Oct 5 '20 at 18:00

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