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When do I use significant figure rules in physics for arithmetic.

I already know that I have to use it for unit conversions.

Where else would I have to use it?

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This is an extremely broad question. It might be easier to say when you don't. There are cases where numbers are considered to have infinite significant figures. For instance, a square has exactly four sides. Also, you don't need to round during intermediate calculations (and if you do round, you shouldn't round to fewer than one more than the overall number of significant figures). In casual settings, non-scientific settings, you can get away with ignoring the rules (For instance, the common figure of 98.6 degrees for body temperature was obtained by taking the temperature of 37 degrees centigrade and converting it to Farenheit and keeping one more significant figure than appropriate. You shouldn't use 98. in a scientific context, but it's common to use it in casual discussions among laypeople.) There are likely times you won't be graded on significant figures, and of course if you have a multiple choice question, you need only enough precision to distinguish between the options. I found some this whether you will lose points on the AP test. There are cases where people ignore the rules even in scientific contexts, for instance "This is enough to have paid each of the estimated 462,182 rally attendees $26,553.64 not to attend.", which shows a lack of scientific literacy. If you're making a decision where the answer isn't close to the threshold, you don't need the exact number of significant figures. For instance, if you have some water that you want to make sure doesn't boil, then given standard conditions, a temperature of 78 degrees centigrade is low enough, and you don't really need to know whether you need to round it or not.

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