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According to my knowledge the exclusion principle won't affect it, so it will jump to the muonic 1s orbit (strongly deformed by the electrons' repulsion). The electrons fill the electron 1s orbits (also distorted). So it would become like a He, but much heavier and easier to ionize.

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  • $\begingroup$ Found a similar question that partially answeres the question: chemistry.stackexchange.com/q/125171 $\endgroup$ – RobertSzili Sep 15 '20 at 12:29
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    $\begingroup$ So because electron-nucleus and muon-nucleus bond are on different energy scale, the problem can be separated into two parts: The muon would see a nucleus with 3+ charge in a large negative change-cloud. The electrons would see a 2+ charged nucleus. After 2us the muon decays and its energy blows away all two electrons. Am I right? $\endgroup$ – RobertSzili Sep 15 '20 at 12:46
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    $\begingroup$ The second comment is basically right. In your first comment you say that the Chem.SE answer only partially answers your question. What exactly hasn't been answered? $\endgroup$ – Ruslan Sep 15 '20 at 17:41
  • $\begingroup$ How can I close the question with marking the second comment as best answer? (I know its my comment, but its correct) $\endgroup$ – RobertSzili Sep 20 '20 at 13:22
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    $\begingroup$ You can re-post the comment as an answer, and then accept it. $\endgroup$ – Ruslan Sep 20 '20 at 13:25
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It seems like my answer is correct. So repost:

So because electron-nucleus and muon-nucleus bond are on different energy scale, the problem can be separated into two parts: The muon would see a nucleus with 3+ charge in a large negative change-cloud. The electrons would see a 2+ charged nucleus. After 2us the muon decays and its energy blows away all two electrons.

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