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I just read an article from the KATRIN experiment in 2019 that they had the mass of the neutrino down to 1.1 ev. They were trying to pin the mass even lower than that? I have not seen any articles saying they succeeded.

Cosmological measurements suggests that the mass should be no more than .1 ev. The WIKI page states that it is .120 ev. Who's experiments (if any) have verified this mas?

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    $\begingroup$ Is there a reason why you seem (by talking about “weight”) to be asking about their gravitational mass rather than their inertial mass? $\endgroup$
    – G. Smith
    Sep 13, 2020 at 21:26
  • $\begingroup$ Other than that was what the article was discussing... $\endgroup$
    – Rick
    Sep 13, 2020 at 22:02
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    $\begingroup$ We have no idea what article you read since you did not provide a link to it. $\endgroup$
    – G. Smith
    Sep 13, 2020 at 22:08
  • $\begingroup$ I cannot believe that KATRIN is attempting to measure the gravitational mass of neutrinos, since I don’t believe that this is technologically possible. If you provide a reference that this is the goal, I will be very interested to read it. I believe the goal is to measure the inertial mass. The masses are probably, but not necessarily, the same. $\endgroup$
    – G. Smith
    Sep 13, 2020 at 22:16

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These are the most recent results I found in the arXiv:

According to https://arxiv.org/abs/2007.05338, these are still the best cosmological and KATRIN results (respectively) as of July 2020. This paper also notes that the minimum value allowed by oscillation experiments is $0.06$ eV.

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