0
$\begingroup$

Isn't it just 1 coulomb of electrons passing any cross section per second? Why is it involved here in magnetism?

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

ToAmpere's law can be written (for static fields) $$\oint \vec{H}\cdot d\vec{l} = I_{\rm enc}\ ,$$ where $\vec{H}$ is the "magnetic field", which is integrated around a closed path, and $I_{\rm enc}$ is the current enclosed by that path.

From this equation it is clear that the H-field has units of A/m (in SI units).

It seems quite likely that you have become confused between the B-field (magnetic flux density, which is often called the magnetic field and has SI units of Tesla) and the H-field (also often called the magnetic field or magnetic field intensity), which has units of A/m.

| cite | improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

The Biot-Savart law for a steady current gives the magnetic field as follows: $$\vec B(\vec r) = \dfrac{μ_0}{4π}\int\dfrac{(\vec I \times(\vec r - \vec r'))}{(\vec r - \vec r')^3}dl$$ Since $\vec I$ is in amperes, $\vec r$ and $\vec r'$ ar in meters, you get that unit for magnetic field

| cite | improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Welcome! This answer (v1) assumes a system of units where $\mu_0$ is dimensionless, but in SI that constant has dimension tesla-meter/ampere. $\endgroup$ – rob Sep 12 at 15:46
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ It is the field H, not the field B, which is measured in A/m in SI units. $\endgroup$ – GiorgioP Sep 12 at 16:18

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.