-3
$\begingroup$

When an object is on an inclined plane the force of gravity acts downwards on the object and the normal force is perpendicular to the surface of the inclined plane. When we normally solve these problems we often break the force of gravity into 2 components. One of those components is parallel to the inclination of the ramp and the other perpendicular to the ramp. The perpendicular component often has the same magnitude as the normal force. How can you conclude this?

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

so we can usually see from these things that the perpendicular direction has no overall acceleration but we know gravity has a component in this direction so by virtue of newtons third law we must know that the component of gravity in that perpendicular direction must have some equal and opposite force from the slope this is where the normal force comes from. so the normal force is a consequence of the force form the object on the slope not the other way around.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy