0
$\begingroup$

How can the speed of oscillation of a harmonic oscillator be affected if somehow it got accelerated to a relativistic speed perpendicular to its oscillation? Can this be compared with the effect on relativistic laser clock?

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

In the inertial frame of the harmonic oscillator the frequency/speed is not affected. But according to the rest frame, the frequency is lower because of time dilation. In the rest frame, the reduced frequency can be explained by the mass (should rather be called inertia) increasing (see relativistic mass) and the spring constant decreasing.

$\endgroup$
2
  • $\begingroup$ If it would be somehow possible that that oscillator makes traces on a infinitely long plate paralel to the direction of translation(not oscillation) when slightly touching it,will the lenght between points start increasing more than just linearly while the oscillator approaches the speed of light? $\endgroup$ – Janko Bradvica Sep 4 '20 at 17:31
  • $\begingroup$ Assuming that the proper acceleration (i.e. the acceleration that the harmonic oscillator "feels") is constant, there are two relativistic effects to take into consideration: time dilation and that the acceleration will decrease (since speed cannot exceed $c$). Even if the latter works opposite to the former, I think (without having done calculations) that the wavelength will increase more than linearly. $\endgroup$ – md2perpe Sep 4 '20 at 18:04

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.