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To maintain the current in the purely inductive circuit why is the applied alternating voltage is equal and opposite to the induced e.m.f in an inductor . I'm unable to understand this point Why isn't the net e.m.f of the circuit becomes zero What is meant by to maintain the flow of current in the circuit In what conditions the current will flow or not

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The alternating current will flow as long as you have your voltage source connected. If it is really a (theoretical) ideal inductor, you will not spend energy. but maybe i did not understand your question and you try to make it more clear.

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The electrical-mechanical analogies are useful to understand this type of doubts.

A pure inductive circuit is like a mass. An external voltage is like a force.

Applying an oscillation voltage is like push and pull an object on a surface without friction. (Friction is the equivalent to electric resistance, and we are considering pure inductive circuit, without resistance).

The fact that there is no friction doesn't mean that an oscillatory force is not present. The force produces acceleration, what for an electrical circuit translates as: oscillatory voltage produces oscillatory current.

That is more here than the other analogies with water circuits, because this mechanical systems are described by the same types of differential equations of the electric circuits.

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