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Would it be possible to compress enough matter into a small enough space using explosives, using roughly the same concepts as a nuclear bomb? of course, this couldn't be done with traditional explosives, but maybe with some sort of nuclear or even antimatter explosion, using some sort of gas such as helium as a reaction mass that could rapidly expand with the heat generated and produce enough pressure to form a black hole(i have know idea if this would work btw). What other explosives could generate such a pressure? If this was remotely possible, on what scale would it need to be done to form the event horizon(eg. country sized, earth sized, sun sized...)?

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    $\begingroup$ What explosive can squeeze the entire planet of Earth to the size of a peanut? $\endgroup$ – safesphere Aug 26 '20 at 3:14
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    $\begingroup$ @safesphere sort of the opposite of the "earth-shattering KABOOM" :-) $\endgroup$ – Carl Witthoft Aug 26 '20 at 11:54
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    $\begingroup$ You might start by looking up the calculated pressures inside collapsing stars and use that to guesstimate the googol-class TNT-tonnage required. $\endgroup$ – Carl Witthoft Aug 26 '20 at 11:56
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    $\begingroup$ this analogy makes complete sense but if this were to work, it wouldn't be the explosive byproducts that would create the black hole, but the matter it is compressing. Ideally, the pressure would not be evenly distributed but concentrated into an extremely small area, hopefully resulting in the compression of the matter being uneven, with the explosive byproducts having a relitively low density, and the thinga were trying to compress at an extremely high density. Perhaps if the explosion was given enough time to settle, it would reach an equilibrium... $\endgroup$ – Reuben Farley-Hall Aug 27 '20 at 0:22
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    $\begingroup$ @safesphere Your description only holds if the TNT is inside the volume. Consider how the laser-confinement fusion systems work: light pressure from outside the sample volume forces that volume to collapse. I think this is what Reuben FH is pointing out $\endgroup$ – Carl Witthoft Aug 27 '20 at 11:55
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Sort of. Black holes are produced by supernovae. A supernova is when a star at the end of its life erupts into a giant explosion. But it isn't the explosion that produces the black hole.

A very brief version of the story is at https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/supernova/en/

Wikipedia has more. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supernova

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    $\begingroup$ Yes, we know (or have high-quality theories) as to how black holes develop. That's not the question here. $\endgroup$ – Carl Witthoft Aug 26 '20 at 11:54

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